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Fjällräven Kånken Greenland

by Neil Summers

Swedish outdoor brand Fjällräven are currently celebrating 50 years since the arrival of their iconic Greenland coat and as part of this jacket based jubilee they’ve put together a very special version of their Kånken bag. The KånkenGreenland also makes up part of the ‘Greenland Updated’ collection which comprises of a number of Fjällrävenproducts each inspired by a new generation of people now living in Greenland – scientists and nature enthusiasts from all over the world who’ve left their homes in order to explore this pristine island. As well as providing the inspiration for Fjallraven’s first product Greenland is also home to the world’s second biggest ice sheet which plays a pivotal role in global climate change. Its sheer sun-reflecting ability moderates global temperatures, while its meltwater mitigates ocean circulation patterns. So if the entire ice sheet were to melt, global sea levels would rise by 7.2m, hence the need for some well dressed scientists to  be there.

Greenland Jacket then and now

The updated Greenland version of the Kånken joins the an impressive range that now includes the Mini Kånken, theKånken Laptop, the  KånkenBig, the upcycled Re- Kånken and the leather-detailed Kånken No. 2. This new Greenland version features the same classic design buy uses an updated G-1000 HeavyDuty Eco fabric that’s slightly thicker than the original  Kånken. Whilst the fabric is produced (in part) from recycled materials and has been waterproofed without the use of perfluorocarbons. As an additional touch the webbing straps have been given a lovely striped detailing, which matches the detailing on the other items in the Greenland series.

View all Kanken Greenlands.

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The Grenfell Cordings Shooter Jacket

by Neil Summers

Though Grenfell’s origins can be traced back to 1923, their iconic Shooter jacket first came about during the 1940s and has changed very little since. Essentially it’s a shooting jacket that’s smart enough to be worn around town this new version differs from the original thanks to a waterproof backing alongside the rain resistant Grenfell Cloth and has also been treated to a gentle garment washing process to compliment the jacket’s heritage look.  Created for Cordings of Piccadilly this version also features three external pockets as opposed to the usual four with an additional game pocket on the inside that can be taken out and cleaned as and when required, with the bellows pockets featuring eyelets to let any unwanted water escape.

As with all Grenfell products it’s the attention to detail that really makes this Shooter jacket stand out as well as it’s timeless, functional design. For example the sturdy collar can be turned up to keep the wind out, with both a top button and a throat tab to batten things down whilst the bellow pockets feature eyelets to allow water to escape. The jacket’s cuffs are elasticated to avoid the wind billowing up the arms whilst you’re taking aim or just out walking the dog. Vintage versions of this stylish yet practical field jacket have been going for hair raising prices at auction recently, I can see this version destined to be one of Grenfell’s most highly prized jackets in years to come.

The Grenfell shooter is now online at The Sporting Lodge.

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Pendleton Woolen Mills – The Legendary Blankets

by Neil Summers

Over the past 25 years, Pendleton Woolen Mills have developed a series of Legendary blankets all of which are based on the beliefs and traditions of their original and most valued customers, the Native American Indian. Though founded by British weaver Thomas Kay back in 1863 it was only after the purchase of a mill along the Oregon Trail in 1909 that their blankets, robes and shawls became highly prized by the Native American population.

One of the reasons for the popularity of these products is thanks to the care taken by the pattern designers to learn about the native mythologies and design preferences of their customers. In the earliest years, Joe Rawnsley, who was considered a gifted talent on the jacquard loom, took time out with the local natives of northeastern Oregon to develop and understand their preferences of colour and design. Which he would then interpret the ideas gleaned from the native peoples into blanket designs using modern technologies that could express pattern ideas in much greater detail and in more vivid colours that could be expressed by traditional weaving methods.

Local business men during a Pendleton Mill tour in 1910.

Wiith the success of these first designs, Mr. Rawnsley went on to spend a further spent six months in the native Southwest developing ideas for designs that would specifically appeal to the tribes of this region. He returned with hundreds of designs to be interpreted into his weaving processes and also entering Pendleton blankets into the ‘Indian trade’. Meaning that local natives started to take the blankets down from Oregon to the Southwest tribes in order to exchange them for silver jewellery, wool or other items of value. The colourful blankets were also integrated into everyday and ceremonial uses; part of a dowry, weddings, gift giving, pow wows, dance prizes, naming ceremonies, funerals and memorials. With blankets often being placed into coffins to keep loved ones warm on their journey.

Today, Pendleton blankets continue to play a significant role in Indigenous communities across North America with the tradition of wool and textile innovation established by Thomas Kay and his family underlying all Pendleton products. Though the good news now is that you don’t have to belong to a Native American tribe in order to own one as The Sporting Lodge are now proud stockists of this incredible American brand.

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Shooting Instructor’s Day Off To The Royal Cheshire County Fair

by Brett Davies.

It’s a bad sign when your day off work starts with an early morning. But, if you are planning a visit to The Royal Cheshire County Fair, I highly recommended that dreaded early morning start. After a quick Starbucks stop off we still had a long wait in show traffic before we reached the ground. Wishing I hadn’t ordered the Large Coffee we swiftly headed towards the gates.

The Royal Cheshire County Fair, with the familiar smells of cows to your right, pigs to your left and sheep straight ahead. We have been coming to the show for a good few years on the run, no map was needed as everything is well signposted.

We started with the livestock, a good idea considering it was boiling hot and all the tents that featured animals were nice and cool. An impressive display of the sheep shearing gave me some good knowledge to try out on the dogs later at home. The young lads worked quick and precise before educating the audience on the age old tradition.

The Royal Cheshire Show is a good place to look at cars, yes cars (?). As always there was a stronghold of auto-mobiles in the middle of the show ground.

Instead we headed to the main ring and the always exciting Pony Club Games. I highly recommend looking at the games, they are full of energy, some impressive speed and competitive spirit. For those who don’t know what The Pony Club Games are, it is like a sports day for kids on ponies. With games that include passing items to other rides, collecting items and placing them in set places all whilst on a pony and travelling at high speeds. The teams receive points for completing the challenges first, the winning team won a memorial trophy at the end of the games.

Being proud owners of a LOT of poultry, one of our favourite parts of the show is the poultry tent. Which if you are like us and like seeing the different arrays of chickens, ducks, turkeys and geese, I would recommend you visiting the show on the first day. The second day leaves only the winning birds, pigeons and rabbits. Unfortunately, at this point Mrs Davies noticed the Pygmy Goat Club sign. Luckily for me she couldn’t fit the goat she had gotten attached to under her shirt, though I’m sure if my back was turned, she would have tried. But, I would like to say a big thank you to the lady who took the time to convince Mrs Davies that the best dog to own is an Irish Wolf Hounds. The dog show provides an array of dog breeds from the great to the small but equally great.

The Show arenas hold all kinds of attractions, from the Scots Guard Association Pipe Band, Falconry Displays, The parade of the cattle and one of my favourite attractions, the Huntsman and Hounds.

We took a trip down to the have a go clay pigeon shooting, with good incoming targets for first timers, they also had an air rifle range and archery. It was nice to see a wide variation of people having a go at the shooting stand. Talking of shooting, back to work I go with a full week of lessons ahead. The Cheshire show is a good county fair and a good day off. But we are, as always, excited for the year’s supply of Game Fairs.

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Introducing – Brett Davies

The Sporting Lodge would like to give a warm welcome to our new blog contributor Brett Davies.

Brett is a highly experienced game and clay pigeon shooting instructor at North Wales Shooting School, with an impressive history in competitive shooting.

As a junior, Brett re-wrote history by winning the Home International Championship with a score of 196/200 making him the Inter Countries all round Champion. He was the only junior to win this title. He also was the Home International Champion at Automatic Ball Trap as a Junior shooting for England.

Brett then went on to represent The England Shooting Team three times, winning the English Open Sporting AA class and the English Open ABT.

In 2016, America also opened up a wealth of opportunities for Brett, as this is where he achieved 12th place in the Seminole Cup.

Staying true to his roots, Brett represents Cheshire in national inter counties competitions where he has become Cheshire’s English sporting, English Skeet and Olympic trap county champion numerous times at senior level. Within Cheshire, Brett is also the Sporting and Skeet Doubles Champion.

At present, Brett is ranked 8th in the official CPSA top ten ranked English sporting shooters in the country. Brett is also the current West Midlands Inter Counties all round Champion.

We are really looking forward to getting a glimpse into Brett’s life, seeing where his shooting careers takes him next and getting some of those valuable shooting tips!

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3 Things to Consider When Clay Pigeon Shooting

3 Things to Consider When Clay Pigeon Shooting

Stance

It is important to stand comfortably when shooting, but positioning and angle is essential too. The front foot generally should be pointing to where you are going to shoot, and the other placed in a way that provides balance when shooting. Being unstable can disturb your alignment and therefore reduce the accuracy of your shot.

Cartridge Choice

Cartridge choice is really down to opinion and preference. The most important thing is being confident with what you’re shooting as this is more likely to ensure consistent scores. The best thing to determine which cartridge is most suitable is to test them and how they go through the gun you are shooting. One method of doing this is to pattern them at around 30 yards and then see how many gaps are in the pattern. It is best to have little or no gaps to reduce the chance of not breaking the clay. 

Time to Shoot

Although shooting in warmer, less windy conditions is always preferable, it is important to practice in all weather conditions if you are planning on taking part in registered competitions as this prepares you for whatever conditions you may be faced with. Knowing how to respond to rain, sun, wind and different lighting will provide you with an advantage.

Thanks Fred – really great top tips! For all your shooting accessories & clothing at The Sporting Lodge browse here.

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Fred Whitehurst – at the English Open Sporting Championship

I mentioned in my intro blog that I was going to be taking part in the English Open Sporting Championship, so I thought I would update you on how it went. The event took place on Wednesday 10th May at Highwaymans Shooting Ground in Suffolk. Fortunately, we had extremely nice weather and the conditions were perfect for shooting – Nice and warm with no wind meaning the consistency of the targets was very good.

The shoot itself was set up very well and ran very smoothly, which helps to reduce any nerves. There was a range of targets to suit shooters of all abilities. I shot 105/120 putting me in joint 3rd in the juniors category, however as I decided the 4 hour drive to the final would be inconvenient I did not get placed.

Highwaymans Shooting Ground is a fantastic CPSA Registered ground, which I would definitely recommend it to other keen shooters.

Thanks Fred, and well done – keep us posted!

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Cleaning a Gun in Six Simple Steps:

Fred Whitehurst talks gun cleaning – 

Cleaning a Gun in Six Simple Steps:

  1. Dismantle the gun and wipe down with a cloth to remove any grease from handling the gun.
  2. Spray barrel cleaning solution down the barrels and leave for a few minutes.
  3. Run through both barrels with a phosphor bronze brush to remove the debris.
  4. Use a mop to remove any further debris left within the barrels.  
  5. Wipe down the action and grease all of the moving parts to reduce wear on the gun.
  6. It is also a good idea to remove the chokes from the gun, clean them and grease when putting them back in. Using grease instead of oil for the chokes means that they are less likely to come loose when shooting. 

I would advise that you clean your gun after every time it has been shot, as there may be moisture left in the barrels of the cartridges. This kind of damp can cause rust in the barrels. 

Thanks Fred, top tips! There are many different cleaning accessories available from Beretta. GMK, Perazzi, Purdey and more. Fancy a browse? Head over to The Sporting Lodge

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Introducing – Fred Whitehurst

Meet Fred Whitehurst, our newest Blog Contributor for The Sporting Lodge.

Hi, I’m Fred Whitehurst, a 17 year old shooting enthusiast. My Dad introduced me to game shooting at a young age, and over the past three years I have also got into clay pigeon shooting as it allows me to get my practice in all year round.

I was ranked No 1 in colts in UK until I recently moved up to the juniors where I am now ranked 8th in the UK.

I shoot most weekends, whether that be practising, taking part in local shooting competitions or representing Cheshire CPSN at county shows around the country. My next big competition is the English open this week where I will be hoping to improve on my no 8 ranking. Wish me luck!

My current weapon of choice is a Perazzi MX8, 12 bore 30½” barrel (my pride and joy).

At home, we have 4 dogs; 2 working cockers, a German wirehaired pointer and a lab x Collie. This is my dog which I have trained myself to be a retriever at our local bird shoot throughout the winter when I am not clay shooting.

I have a real passion for everything outdoors and I am currently studying agricultural engineering, so I am pretty handy on the tools which has put me in good stead whilst working on my Defender.

If you would like to keep up to date with my progress, my passion the sport of shooting and maybe a few hints and tips then you can find my latest posts here on The Sporting Lodge Blog.

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Wigwam – Brand New to The Sporting Lodge

by Mark Smith,

Founded in 1905, Wigwam was the creation three men – Herbert Chesebro, Robert Ehany, and Lawerance Bentz. This trio had previously worked for the Sheboygan Knitting Company but when it burnt down, they quickly combined to fill its place.

In a town benefiting from diverse immigration, Wigwam rose to prominence quickly, supplying the various lumbermen of the area. Sheboygan had originally been officially founded 49 years earlier but prior to that it was inhabited by various Native American tribes.

By 1936, Chesebro had taken full control of the company, but like many businesses, the war effort led to a shift in production, with 75% of their capacity being used to make socks for troops overseas.

In the post-war years, Wigwam used its strong reputation to branch out into all kinds of hosiery, with a forward-thinking outlook which has kept the company at the forefront for more than a century.

Today, Wigwam make some of the finest, most hard wearing and hard working socks on the market.

We are pleased to now be stocking Wigwam at The Sporting Lodge, browse the range!